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Visualizing electromagnetic fields

In a recent project the pair decided to make visible the electromagnetic field (EMF) that surrounds many of the devices we use in our daily lives. To do this they used long exposure photography and stop-frame animation to produce light paintings that show the EMFs that surrounds laptops and a old school tape deck.

"Through a series of experiments in photographic and lighting techniques followed by hacking up an Android phone to act as an EMF indicator and then coding our own app in Processing we were able to visualize how these fields change over objects." Sturgeon says.

You can check out the results in the video above and in the pics of electrically-charged, colorful apparitions below.

Source article: https://creators.vice.com/en_us/article/vvy4gb/light-painting-the-electromagnetic-field

The world around us is populated by invisible phenomenon. Most of the modern technology that we use is sometimes invisible. As interaction designers, we constantly talk about them and use them to shape experiences. However, sometimes we also wonder how might they look and behave like? And that is exactly what this project set out to explore – to make the invisible visible.

We chose to make Electromagnetic Fields (EMFs) that surround us visible. EMFs are particularly strong around devices with electrical and magnetic parts. Using long exposure photography and stop-frame animation we tried to ‘light-paint’ the EMF around objects like our laptops and an old tape-deck.

Through a series of experiments in photographic and lighting techniques followed by customising an Android phone to act as an EMF indicator and then coding our own app in Processing we were able to visualize how these fields change over objects.

Further information can be found on the project's blog post:
http://lukesturgeon.co.uk/2013/07/visualising-electromagnetic-fields/.

Interaction designer Luke Sturgeon and Shamik Ray have also been visualizing what's unseen by human eyes.

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